CPAs and Advisors with Your Growth in Mind

JOBS Act Exemptions to Expire Soon for Emerging Growth Companies

Businesses that went public under the designation of emerging growth companies shortly after the JOBS Act of 2012 was enacted could soon lose their exemptions from the law. The five-year exemptions included in the JOBS Act, which curtails regulations for young companies that raise investor funds and encourages initial public offerings, are set to expire soon. Once the exemptions expire, hundreds of young companies will be subject to various accounting, disclosure and corporate governance requirements foreign to them. One exemption set to go away relates to Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Section 404(b) requires an external auditor to review. Read More.

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Revenue Recognition

By: Brynn McNeil, Partner Revenue is critically important in the financial statements of companies. Thus, revenue recognition remains a priority for regulators and the accounting profession as a whole. Implementing the new revenue recognition standard, Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, will likely be the most significant and comprehensive change in many years for most companies. The core principle of FASB ASC 606 is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for. Read More.

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Supreme Court Tightens Dodd-Frank Whistleblower Protections

In a unanimous ruling, the Supreme Court narrowed the definition of a whistleblower under the Dodd-Frank Act. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second, Fifth and Ninth Circuits had different rulings over the interpretation of the whistleblower protections, but the Supreme Court ultimately decided on a narrow definition. The decision stems from the case of Digital Realty Trust v. Somers, which involved the termination of former Digital Realty Trust vice president Paul Somers after he reported possible violations to management. Somers claimed that the Dodd-Frank whistleblower protections, which bar companies from retaliating against employees who report misconduct under certain. Read More.

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SEC Approves Revised Cybersecurity Disclosure Guidance

On February 21, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) unanimously approved new interpretive guidance concerning public company disclosures related to cybersecurity. The updated guidance in Release No. 33-10459, Commission Statement and Guidance on Public Company Cybersecurity Disclosures, outlines the SEC’s thoughts on public companies’ disclosure requirements regarding cybersecurity risks, threats and incidents. Release No. 33-10459 also encourages public companies to implement cybersecurity policies and procedures and to apply disclosure controls and procedures, insider trading prohibitions, and Regulation FD and selective disclosure prohibitions. The SEC believes the interpretive guidance will help public companies provide more transparent and detailed disclosures about potential threats to their computer systems and networks. Release No. 33-10459 is effective. Read More.

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Bottom-Ranked Colleges Falling Behind Top Counterparts

An analysis of the colleges listed in The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education ranking reveals an alarming shift in higher education. According to the analysis, colleges closer to the bottom of the list were more likely to have lower enrollment numbers. In addition, those same colleges are having trouble keeping up with the schools near the higher end of the list. The trend leads one expert to predict that in the next five years, employers won’t value a degree from one of the poorest-ranked colleges as much as a degree from a top school. More on this analysis is available on The Wall Street Journal website.

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It’s Almost That Time Again…. How to Get a Head Start on your Annual Incurred Cost Submission

By: Eric Poppe, Senior Manager and Javier Diaz, Manager It’s that time of year. Year-end financial statement audits are going on, you are working with your accountant on your tax returns hoping to complete on time, and just around the corner, you are required to submit your Incurred Cost Submission (“ICS”). Is there time to breathe? As we know, for companies with a fiscal year ending December 31, 2017, the 2017 ICS will be due by June 30, 2018, six months after the close of that fiscal year. The determining factor which requires companies to submit an ICS is the Federal Acquisition Regulation (“FAR”). Read More.

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