CPAs and Advisors with Your Growth in Mind

So You Think You Are Ready for Due Diligence?

At the stage of a company’s development where it is advantageous to think about the sale of all or part of the business to a financial or strategic buyer, management teams are generally prepared to undergo a certain amount of due diligence from the buyer organization. Government contractors expect to undergo close examination of their accounting records, contract files, HR files, legal contracts, and other files and records. Many government contractors do not think that their tax files and practices will present areas of great concern, but often these areas can lead to unpleasant surprises for selling organizations. Specifically, here. Read More.

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#MeToo and Federal Contractors

By: John Ford, Senior Consultant Most of us have probably heard of the misconduct allegations made recently against high profile individuals in the media, entertainment industry, and Congress. Many of these allegations involve violations of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“CRA”), while others may involve allegations of civil or criminal violations such as battery or even rape. While probably not as likely to make the headlines like the recent widely publicized cases, contractors can face many of these problems. This article will provide a high-level overview of some of the contracting issues contractors can face if their employees. Read More.

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The New Revenue Recognition World

By: Michael Brown, Senior Manager The effective date for the new revenue recognition standard is fast approaching and will be here before we know it. By now, you have probably heard speculation about the impact of the standard to your company. Speculation has been from no impact at all to the world is going to be entirely different post implementation. As always, the reality is somewhere in the middle. Generally speaking, for the government contracting industry, the end result of when and how much revenue is recognized will be similar as in the past or at least should not significantly. Read More.

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How Many Contractors Does It Take to Run the Government?

By: John Ford , Senior Consultant, Government Contractor Services Group For many years, there has been a debate as to how many contractors are performing work for the government. This issue has two components: (1) the number of entities holding contracts; and (2) the number of individuals who are actually performing those contracts. While the former is fairly easy to determine, the latter is more problematic. This article will discuss two of the tools available to the government to make this determination. These tools also help the government to know how much these employees are costing the government. The first tool, required. Read More.

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If the Government Claims a Refund, When did the “Claims Clock” Start Running?

By: David Lundsten , Partner, Government Contractor Services Group and John Ford , Senior Consultant, Government Contractor Services Group The Contract Disputes Act (“CDA”) requires a contract claim by either party (the government or the contractor) to be submitted within six years after accrual of the claim. This six-year “claims clock” is otherwise known as the CDA Statute of Limitations (“SOL”). The CDA does not state the test for determining when a claim accrues. However, the Federal Acquisition Regulation (“FAR”) has filled this gap at FAR 33.201, which states that a claim accrues when “all events, that fix the alleged liability . . .. Read More.

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Required Documentation in Support of Consultant Costs

By: Curt Smith, Manager, Government Contractor Services Group The allowability of consultant costs is sometimes a point of contention between contractors and Defense Contract Audit Agency (“DCAA”) auditors, and often the issue is insufficient documentation. What evidence is required by the Federal Acquisition Regulation (“FAR”) to document consultant costs sufficiently and how do auditors determine allowability given this requirement? A quick review of FAR and guidance for DCAA auditors concerning consultant costs will greatly help answer these questions. The general parameters of allowability for consultant costs are described in FAR 31.205-33 — Professional and Consultant Service Costs. However, other cost. Read More.

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