CPAs and Advisors with Your Growth in Mind

The Auditor Strikes Back: Always a Bonus of Contention

As we reported in October, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (“DCAA”) Contract Audit Manual (“CAM”) was recently updated. One of the 13 areas of cost updated related to bonus and incentive compensation costs. This topic is covered in Chapter 7 of both the previous version and new version of the CAM. Bonuses and incentive compensation can mean many things including cash, stock, stock options, stock appreciation rights, phantom stock plans, and/or a combination of the aforementioned forms. Bonus and incentive compensation can also be paid in the short/current term or in the future/long term. These plans can differ greatly between contractors and. Read More.

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Auditor Strikes Back: Appreciating Depreciation

The Selected Areas of Cost guidebook replaces Chapter 7 of the Defense Contract Audit Agency (“DCAA”) Contract Audit Manual (“CAM”). One of the 13 sections that have been rewritten and updated covers depreciation. Below we will take a deep dive into some of the new updates. When a contractor typically owns tangible personal property which provides services for a number of years, that cost is recorded as an asset (rather than expense) in the year the asset is acquired. According to the matching principle, a portion of the asset should be reported as an expense during each period of the. Read More.

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DCAA and Executive Compensation after Taylor/Metron

By: John Ford , Senior Consultant, Government Contractor Services Group Within a period of approximately six months at the beginning of 2012, the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals (“ASBCA”; “the Board”) issued two significant decisions concerning the process for determining reasonable compensation under Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 31.205-6(b)(2). These decisions were J.F. Taylor, Inc., ASBCA Nos. 56105 and 56322 (Jan. 18, 2012) and Metron, Inc., ASBCA Nos. 56624, 56751 and 56752 (June 4, 2012). In both cases, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (“DCAA”) had questioned substantial amounts of compensation as being unreasonable. This conclusion was reached by following the standard procedure. Read More.

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